Can I use my own SSL cert in the standard hosted version?


(Bo Vice) #1

Is there any way to enable SSL with a certificate we already own on the $100 hosted standard plan?


(Jeff Atwood) #2

Using a custom, customer cert is only supported on the enterprise plan. It is easier and simpler for us to control the cert, update it, renew it, etc so we are responsible end to end.


#3

Does that mean we cannot run SSL on the $100 hosted standard plan?


(Mittineague) #4

https://payments.discourse.org/buy/

SSL Option

For an additional $20/month, your site can be served over a secure HTTPS connection, and increase your plan limits:

Staff users 5 → 10
Page views 100k → 150k
Storage 10gb → 15gb


#5

Thanks, I saw the SSL option on the buy page, but not the explanation for the * next to it.


(Bo Vice) #6

Thanks for the response @codinghorror. As @ccdw mentioned, an explanation for what the limitations are on the standard and business plan for SSL certificates on the would be appreciated instead of just throwing a * next to it.


(Joshua Rosenfeld) #7

Um, the SSL Option is blue and underlined, indicating it is a hyperlink. Clicking on it brings up the exact text that @Mittineague shared. How else would you like the explanation to be posted to the webpage?


#8

Here’s what I see - OSX, Chrome…


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(Joshua Rosenfeld) #9

Right, so click on SSL option:


#10

Yes. I know. But I didn’t realise it 'til you mentioned it.

Call me old fashioned if you like, but an asterisk to me, signifies further explanation elsewhere on the page.

It’s not important, but knowing how everybody here likes to follow the detail, I thought it was worthwhile pointing it out - and that 2 users asked the same question within a day or so, might suggest that others, including potential customers, are also confused.


(Joshua Rosenfeld) #11

Well, no argument there. I would agree that on almost everything (paper and online), an asterisk (or other symbol) indicates that there is detail elsewhere (typically below). The first time I saw that I did indeed scroll down to look for an explanation.

At the same time, blue text on the internet typically implies a link…so I guess it depends on the audience. Maybe adding the “standard” hyperlink underline would help?


#12

You’ve got me again. I’ve been creating online solutions for almost 20 years and didn’t know that.

Maybe… Although I don’t see popups and hyperlinks as being the same thing.

Best to ask somebody who’s more up to date with conventions. Whoops, there’s an oxymoron if ever there was one.

Thanks for your help.


(Stephen) #13

I’m inclined to agree, blue text without an underline doesn’t have to be a link, it’s not brilliant UX, and yes asterisks mean footnotes or annotations, it shouldn’t be used in that way.

It’s fine for a large and frequently visited site to establish their own conventions, users will get used to different CSS for hyperlinks. In this case changing the colour just adds emphasis, adding the asterisk suggests it will be elaborated upon elsewhere in the page.

That said, the sky hasn’t fallen, the team may choose to tweak it, or not. We’re all friends here, even the pedants.