Will Discourse apply for Google Summer of Code 2015?


(Erlend Sogge Heggen) #1

https://1-ps.googleusercontent.com/sxk/lUi00NOiZZtaYcm5-HDw_Ypz0k/s.google-melange.appspot.com/www.google-melange.com/soc/content/2-1-20150129/images/gsoc/logo/banner-gsoc2015.png.pagespeed.ce.1-XG35qq3RbQOOd_gbWu.png

GSoC 2015 will start accepting applications in a week. I think Discourse should apply. My offer to draft your application for you still stands.

Prospective Student Projects

Could be one big one or a combination of related ones, e.g. “GitHub integrations”.


(Jeff Atwood) #2

Well if you’re offering… why not?

Not sure what to pick from this list though, some of these would be super hard, admin only and boring, and/or don’t apply to many sites.

You are more familiar with GSOC than I am, what is the flavor of the other stuff that gets accepted?


(Sam Saffron) #3

One thing that would help us and is totally self contained yet consumable by all is “data explorer”

We need a simplistic version of data explorer that enables users to run arbitrary queries on a database and is trivial to install by using a ruby gem and rack middleware to do the job.

Quite often, as admins of any site, you need to run ad hoc queries to answer questions and downloading a backup is a pain in the behind not to mention the poor GUI story.


(Jeff Atwood) #4

Yeah @sam’s idea is quite good, and a general web based Postgres data browser / ad hoc query tool would be an excellent open source tool for a lot of projects not just ours!


(Michael Downey) #5

Very happy to see this. From our 9 years experience with GSoC, I think the more interesting questions for Discourse rather than the project ideas themselves (which are probably pretty good) are:

  • Who would be the mentors?
  • Are those mentors each willing to commit a few hours each week to help his or her student?

Also based on experience, may I strongly suggest that you not take any student who hasn’t already at least made on PR (regardless of whether or not it was merged) so you can see a demonstrate of their skills.


(Erlend Sogge Heggen) #6

Very important question indeed.

For a first time participation it’s best to rely on the core developers. The time investment (at least 5 hours a week) is often underestimated, but it can be mitigated by having 2-3 developers per student. Two project slots should suffice.

[quote=“downey, post:5, topic:24776”]
Also based on experience, may I strongly suggest that you not take any student who hasn’t already at least made one PR (regardless of whether or not it was merged) so you can see a demonstrate of their skills.
[/quote]Fully agree.


(Michael Downey) #7

+1 … each student/project should have at least 1 “back up” mentor to give new perspectives, answer questions when the primary mentor is away, etc.


(Erick Guan) #8

Hands up for being a student…


(Michael Downey) #9

FYI: Applications for open source projects opened today, and will be accepted up until 20 February at 19:00 UTC.


(Erlend Sogge Heggen) #10

Yep. Will write it up once I’ve finished the features showcase for v1.2.

Btw @downey, could your organisation vouch for Discourse?

Also, @codinghorror or someone else from the team should probably register a profile for the Discourse application. I’m applying for my own project as well and I don’t think I can be admin for two projects.


(Michael Downey) #11

Absolutely; done. :+1:

Technically I think this is possible, but you definitely have to have two different org admins for the application to be accepted.


(Sam Saffron) #12

Note, I forgot to mention here, I already agreed to mentor @tgxworld for work on http://rubybench.org which is enormously important for all Ruby developers.

I need to make sure we fill up all the paperwork :slight_smile:


(Erlend Sogge Heggen) #13

So is that still gonna go under the Discourse umbrella or are you submitting a separate project for RubyBench?


(Sam Saffron) #14

I am not entirely sure, I think it probably makes more sense under RubyBench, but ultimately its @tgxworld’s choice here.


(Erlend Sogge Heggen) #15

Keep in mind there’s no guarantee you’ll get accepted, so applying as a standalone project can be risky. I would recommend folding it under Discourse, or something even bigger, e.g. Ruby on Rails (couldn’t find one for plain Ruby).


(Sam Saffron) #16

I’ll have a chat with the rails team and ask them if they can add an application for it.


(Michael Downey) #17

That’s probably the sanest approach IMHO. Also keep in mind that as a new project, Discourse will likely only get 1 or maybe 2 student project slots.


(Jeff Atwood) #18

Ok we are all signed up and the page checks out with a proposal. Thanks for the reminders!

The GSoC web UI is really hard to understand, so I don’t know how to link directly to our org, or the proposal…


(Michael Downey) #19

The GSoC pages for orgs aren’t public/linkable until the accepted organizations are announced. However, ostensibly there is an “official” ideas page (Discourse category?) that is hosted somewhere, that potential students can see, which you can use to get the word out.


(Jeff Atwood) #20

That is this page, that’s what I linked to in the application.