Codenames for post-2.0 Discourse releases


(Jeff Atwood) #1

Well, it’s finally happened. We’ve worked on Discourse long enough to have ten official releases in slightly under four years! :tada:

Discourse 1.0 – Aug 26, 2014
Discourse 2.0 – May 31, 2018

Harkening to classic roman/greek era definitions of “forum” …

… we chose the list of ten Attic orators way back when to tag the releases with something kinda fun and Discourse-y.

Try to imagine this person is pressing the Reply button with his free hand:

image

And this is also why our staff pictures are styled as classic marble statues / busts.

Discourse is fundamentally about human communication, which funnily enough literally translates to “running to and fro”:

image

So we now need a new set of release codenames, which I’ll describe in a reply.


(Jeff Atwood) #2

What is Discourse, if not a MIRACULOUS INCREDIBLE INVENTION THAT FURTHERED HUMAN COMMUNICATION!

So combining these two lists handily takes us through 3.0 and even a bit beyond:

  • petroglyph 2.1
  • pictogram 2.2
  • ideogram 2.3
  • writing 2.4
  • alphabet 2.5
  • telegraph 2.6
  • telephone 2.7
  • radio 2.8
  • television 2.9
  • videotelephony 3.0
  • satellite 3.1
  • internet 3.2

To make it a bit more interesting we will be selecting specific examples of said innovation, rather than the general concept, so rather than

  • Discourse 2.1 Petroglyph
  • Discourse 2.2 Pictogram
  • Discourse 2.6 Telegraph

we will have

If anyone wants to propose specific examples for releases 2.3 - 2.5, or 2.7 - 3.2 feel free to do so :wink:


(Nichalas Petranek) #3

For Discourse 2.5 I propose Ugarit
as it’s the region of the Ugaritic Scripts, a better known antecedent to our modern day alphabet.

No, I couldn’t be bothered to crop the bottom of the photo. I was having trouble dismissing the cookies info banner.


(Michael Howell) #4

Anyone opposed to calling 2.9 Nipkow, and 3.1 Sputnik?


#7
  • ideogram 2.3 – Maybe ‘arobase’?
  • television 2.9 – Slow-scan although Nipkow Disk is also a great choice, and Slow-scan can go to videotelephony as well (I have fond memories of poetry readings in the mid-90s with the Electronic Café in Santa Monica from the basement of a cybercafe in Paris using a PicturePhone mod I and flashing puppets that were stored in the basement…)
  • videotelephony 3.0 – PicturePhone. While I’m at it, I also remember a really funny 1996 experience with a 5 ISDN lines PictureTel (3 were used for video, and 2 for audio): we were waiting for a call and the lines started blinking. It took about a minute for all five to light up and show the picture of a corporate guy who looks at us, a bit puzzled, and goes: “Sorry, wrong number.” before he hanged up.