Embedding chat in another webpage?

Is there a way that I could use a chat window, basically inside an iframe on another page - or leverage the existing comments embed view to show a chat thread alongside some other content?

For some background: I’m running an event in the summer and I’m hoping to have a synchronous chat feed that bridges both remote and in person attendees. We’d like folks to view the stream online and chat in the same window, and the in person folks could chat using their phone.

Any thoughts on how this might work - of it is possible with any of the current embedding support in discourse?

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I think this is a great feature request, unfortunately we are not setup at the moment to “widgetize” chat like intercom and others do, but it is certainly something we are thinking about.

I feel it is very much a version 2/3 thing vs something on the immediate roadmap, it would require a major rework of Discourse internals to get this going, especially accounting for “anonymous” chatting among other things.

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There’s a related topic here: Embeddable chat that stages users

I think we can keep them separate for now and assume perhaps that this topic is talking about a feature that wouldn’t necessarily require staging users. If users are not logged in, they’d only have read-only access to the embedded chat.

On the other hand, we haven’t really begun to explore this in any depth, so we are all just imagining together.

If folks have ideas here, getting concrete examples of what you’d like to be able to do or what problem you’re trying to solve would be helpful. Share examples, with mockups or screenshots of where chat would fit on your existing site and how you would intend people to interact with it.

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I’d love to chime in here. In my case, we manage a community for developers who use our platform. In February of this year, we decided our first developer conference would likely have chat embedded next to the stream exactly like OP is describing.

We would also want to allow staged users to chat too, FWIW.

My team manages our internal hackathon, so we did a POC and used Discord and WidgetBot to embed the chat in the page and it was incredibly well-received. Now that we’re putting on our developer conference, we’d really love the holistic experience of embedding the chat from our community directly into the stream.

This way, their chat carries over and it would be a great way to introduce them to the new chat. Unfortunately we’re building the stream page in two weeks, so I’m guessing we’ll have to use Discord this time around.

@mcwumbly you mentioned sharing a mockup, so here’s our mockup that we made for our UX team to design:

Ideally the chat window would contain the interface to type, obviously the interface to see the chat, and some way to switch between channels.

I have a lot of thoughts on this…

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In this scenario, why would it be important to allow staged users to chat (rather than requiring people to sign up if they want to participate)?

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Although our primary users will be attending this event, we’ll also have users like directors/VPs/Execs and even prospective customers who will be there.

We want to be sure everyone can participate in chat even if they haven’t signed up to our community (yet).

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Thanks Jordan - that mock up and use case are indeed quite similar to what I am hoping for.

I am 50/50 on the staged users, personally. For us, we have a SSO setup that mostly works around the issue. But I think Jordan’s case is exactly the right type of consideration. We’ve avoided using other chat tools like Discord due to the user accounts issues.

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FWIW we used Discord in conjunction with Widgetbot to allow chat for unregistered users. It worked incredibly well and we’ll probably use it again until Discourse chat can do this.

I’d rather much use Discourse by the way, this other solution will just be a stop-gap until Discourse supports this.

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